Webinars

In July, the European Commission presented the 'Fit for 55' package of legislative proposals to revise the entire climate and energy policy framework of the EU, including the legislation on the EU ETS, which it aims to strengthen and extend to new sectors. What does this expansion mean for the decarbonization of the European economy, and what lessons have been learned under the EU ETS in 15 years of continuous evolution and improvement? How can these lessons inform developments in other jurisdictions implementing or exploring an ETS as a pillar of their decarbonization strategies?
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Europe at night from above with images of speakers

Fotolia © Guillaume Le Bloas_L

Emissions trading systems result in the creation of a market, with different traded units and a diverse array of market participants. Dynamics in this market can have unintended consequences, and some participants may even act in bad faith. To ensure its smooth functioning, the carbon market therefore calls for oversight, including rules about market access (who can participate in trading, and under what conditions), eligible units (including, where allowed, derivative financial products), transparency and information disclosure, and other aspects of trading activity.
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In 2016, the International Civil Aviation Organization adopted the Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA) to limit the climate impact of international air travel and ensure carbon neutral growth from 2020. The EU has integrated aviation into its own ETS. But are these efforts enough to tackle the growth in emissions from aviation? How can market-based instruments contribute further?

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Coal excavator

© Roland Abel | Fotolia.com

One of the biggest changes in energy systems around the world concerns the use of coal. The share of coal has dropped in numerous countries, and many have now adopted official goals to phase out the use of coal. This webinar explored how carbon pricing can contribute to phasing out coal in some countries; how carbon pricing could affect plans for extending coal use in others; what declining coal use implies for the functioning of carbon market; and which flanking measures are needed to ensure a just transition away from coal.
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Outside the world of economics, ETS – and carbon pricing generally – is frequently misunderstood and misrepresented. This can undermine political support for carbon pricing, as well as public acceptance. What are common mistakes to avoid, and what are effective ways to improve public communication on carbon pricing? This ICAP webinar dealt with these and many more questions around the topic of communicating carbon pricing.
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As public budgets strain in the wake of the global coronavirus pandemic, and with ju-risdictions facing daunting investment needs to achieve ambitious climate commit-ments, emissions trading can serve as an important source of revenue. This ICAP webinar provided insights of revenue use from emission trading systems.
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Agriculture, land use and forestry are challenging sectors to include in a carbon pricing regime – in terms of data availability, the number and size of emission sources and liable entities, capacities for effective enforcement, and others. At the same time, the sector accounts for the bulk of emissions in numerous countries. What are the options to bring agriculture, land use and forestry into a carbon pricing regime, and what can be learned from existing experiences?

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In theory, an ETS can be an efficient tool to reduce emissions – yet in practice, its performance depends on a number of preconditions. One main aspect is the setup and the regulation of the electricity market – is the power sector sufficiently market-oriented for the carbon price to deliver.
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